Your Digital Team's Manager Must Have These 5 Essential Qualities

Posted by KMS Solutions on Apr 4, 2022 2:45:14 AM

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Top project managers are continuously in demand in digital teams all over the world. This is a list of some of the most useful habits that top PMs have. Hopefully, they will assist you in becoming one or determining whether you already have these tendencies.

Being a top digital team's PM helps you stand out, and once you've established yourself as one, you'll be in great demand. Stakeholders will have more faith in you, desire to cooperate with you, and pay attention to your suggestions. Top PMs are always in demand in organizations all across the world, no matter what they're working to construct. This is a list of some of the most important characteristics of successful project managers. Hopefully, they will assist you in becoming one or determining whether you already have these tendencies.

See more: What is Digital Team?

1. Building trust within your team

Every team requires a high level of trust. When it comes to project management, it is constantly discussed and written about, but rarely seen in action. Several different Project Management organizations have recognized the importance of trust in the project management process.

The International Project Management Association just updated its ICB4 certification, which is the global benchmark for individual project, program, and portfolio management competencies.

Scrum's Three Pillars of Empiricism, meanwhile, have long been predicated on the premise that one of the three most critical components in maintaining empirical project control is trust. LEAN and other classic project management approaches follow the same trust-building tendency. What are the primary roadblocks keeping PMs from developing true trust among their teams, given that this has been such a hot topic for so long?

To make this a reality, PMs must foster a culture of transparency and comfort within their teams, as most individuals work better in an environment where team members are free to express themselves and make errors.

A great PM leads by example, living alongside their team, encouraging them to share their mistakes, and using them as learning opportunities. Showing humility and vulnerability is a sign of strength for top PMs. It's true that people often become defensive or shift blame when it comes to admitting to their own mistakes. Explaining why you made a mistake can make you feel vulnerable, but if you honestly admit and evaluate your errors, others will be able to avoid them in the future, and everyone will be able to create trust and open up about their mistakes.

2. Engaging your stakeholders to get them what they require

As a project manager, you're probably well aware that many software projects end up providing something other than what the stakeholders expected or required. This problem is caused by a variety of variables, and it has inspired a slew of innovative techniques aimed at solving it.

Even in the age of Agile development, though, we might still fall into the trap of creating the incorrect thing. Stakeholder analysis is critical, but it frequently begins with the incorrect question. Many projects are started and poorly defined without asking "Why are we doing this?" Many projects are started and incorrectly defined without asking "Why are we doing this?" Many projects fall into the trap of working towards a solution that never addressed the core business requirement.

Top PMs must follow up with the question, "to whom?" in addition to "why?" Which stakeholders are we assisting in the delivery of the solution in order to address their "why?"

Recognizing the genuine business requirement necessitates a thorough grasp of the context and stakeholders, as well as their attitudes, power or influence levels, degree of interest, impact on the project, impact on them, concerns, and, of course, what they will accept as a project's success.

Project manager responsibilities extend beyond solution creation to where solutions go live, in clearly measuring whether the value actually produced aligns with the expected objectives in the goal definition, in order to make projects more successful in achieving their purpose-creating solutions that impact business goals-project manager responsibilities expand beyond solution creation to where solutions go live, in order to make projects more successful in achieving their purpose-creating solutions that impact business goals-project manager responsibilities expand beyond solution creation to where solutions go live, in order to make projects more successful in achieving.

3. Embrace risk management

Users' aversion to change, a lack of resources, and immature technology are just a few of the dangers that almost every project faces. Top project managers encourage their teams to identify not just the typical risks, but also the most important and unique ones, so that risk identification becomes a reflex throughout the project lifecycle, rather than a one-time activity at the start.

Top PMs also consider their collaboration with key stakeholders, who frequently characterize risk in their requirements and concerns, either directly or implicitly. Great project managers recognize that this process occurs from requirement elicitation through the end of the project life cycle, and they see it as a benefit in defining risk throughout the process.

Expert project managers also have faith in their teams and see their expertise as a source of risk mitigation. The PM inspires their team to take ownership of the project and actively participate in risk identification and management in order to empower team members to proactively recognize risk.

In practice, when a team is empowered to contribute to the project's success, the third question at a daily standup, "What is getting in your way?" elicits more cautious responses. Of course, some blockers may be temporary or removed right after the scrum, but others are potential candidates who may become significant risks. Even near the conclusion of the project lifecycle, team members should be encouraged to discover these possible hazards, and their inclusion should be welcomed rather than looked down upon.

4. Understanding the Environment

A project manager should not start a project like a bull in a china shop. Rather than imposing a methodology or project approach, the project manager should do a thorough examination of the environment, formal and informal structures, culture, habits, tools, capabilities, and organizational assets. Only then would he be able to embark on his transformational path.

Top PMs personalize their approach by understanding their environment, rather than relying on a faulty, one-size-fits-all philosophy. They'll be better able to identify the most pressing business demands, how organizations will adapt or accept a solution, adoption, and which adjustments will be made to the solution to attain the correct fit in fulfilling objectives as a result of doing so.

Top project managers must have a thorough understanding of several techniques, including business analysis methodologies, change management frameworks, enterprise architecture frameworks, and other relevant analysis methods, when customizing an efficient project management approach. This enables a project manager to locate the finest answer for the firm at hand in order to complete the project.

5. Applying LEAN Principles

Top project managers must have a thorough understanding of several techniques, including business analysis methodologies, change management frameworks, enterprise architecture frameworks, and other relevant analysis methods, when customizing an efficient project management approach. This enables a project manager to locate the finest answer for the firm at hand in order to complete the project.

Top project managers should use agile project management concepts, which are well defined in LEAN methodology, to identify more efficient and effective processes for the team.

A common misperception is that LEAN is exclusively appropriate for manufacturing. This is just not the case. Every project and process can benefit from LEAN project management techniques. It's more than just a cost-cutting strategy; it's a way of thinking and acting for your team.

"Brilliant process management is our approach," says Toyota CEO Katsuaki Watanabe, summarizing the benefits of implementing LEAN concepts. Average individuals managing brilliant procedures produce great results. We've noticed that smart people managing flawed processes often produce ordinary (or worse) results for our competition."

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Topics: Digital Team